TO THE EDITOR OF THE CORK EXAMINER.

STATE OF THE KANTURK UNION.
Kanturk, Oct. 13, 1847
DEAR SIR– There was an awful meeting of the poor population of the neighbourhood, at the poor-house, this day. It being board day, there were a good number of the Guardians met. The hungry creatures became so clamourous for food, that the soldiers were obliged to be sent for. One of these poor fellows touched, either by intention or otherwise, one of the ex-officios; he was immediately put into irons.

There were 400 admitted this day. There was also a large concern taken, that would accommodate 300 more. In addition to this, the consumption for out-door relief for the week will be over 40 tons of meal. This will give an idea of our situation in Duhallow. We are entering on a season of the most fearful foreboding; the poor without clothes, food, or shelter– no friend scarcely to feel for them except the kind-hearted landlord, who orders them off his lands, and out of his sight, that he might not see nor hear from them.

I forgot to tell you that a deputation from the Board of Guardians waited on the Commissioners, and on the Lord Lieutenant, to know if anything would be done in the way of assisting them, either by a loan or in the shape of employment. The answer from both was the same, although at separate interviews, and that was, to go home, to pay the poor-rates and to collect their rents, and pay every fraction of the loan received from the government. I leave you to judge, Mr. Editor, whether they needed the advice about the rents.

A FRIEND TO THE POOR.

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