FOOD RIOT AT BANTRY.

TO THE EDITOR OF THE CORK EXAMINER.
Bantry, Sept. 6th, 1847.

SIR,– This ill-fated and almost depopulated town became this day the scene of indescribable confusion. The withdrawl of the rations, coupled with the frightful prospect of an approaching winter, have blighted all hopes of existence, and goaded the enraged multitude to desperation. The consequences were painfully exhibited this day. The wretched and famished inhabitants of the neighbouring parishes proceeded to town, and from thence to the Workhouse, where they demanded admission, and as might be expected, were refused. They were not long supplicating, when a large party of military and police were on the ground, commanded by a Captain and Sub-Inspector of Constabulary, all under the control of minor Hutchinson, J.P.

At this stage of the proceedings, the hungry and disappointed applicants commenced uprooting a plot of potato ground attached to the Workhouse; but the military obliged them to retreat as quickly as their exhausted strength would permit them. Some of the dispersed people plucked up some turnips, and eat them whilst retiring. Still nothing serious occurred. Three only were captured for the very clamourous manner in which they sought to obtain food.

It is rumoured here that the melancholy scenes of this day are to be renewed on to-morrow and each succeeding day, until the people find a refuge in the Workhouse.

JEREMIAH O’CALLAGHAN.

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