THE POTATO CROP.

TO THE EDITOR OF THE DUBLIN EVENING POST.
Waterford, June 1, 1847.

MY DEAR CONWAY.– The article on the condition of the potato crop, which appeared in your paper of the 29th ult., caused universal consternation in this quarter. The circumstantial details of the disease which manifested itself, induced every one to believe that the potato was this year as irretrievably gone as in the last. Upon examining, however, the stalks of that vegetable in this quarter, it was found that no appearances presented themselves which could warrant such alarm as the article in your paper was calculated to excite.

People then began to doubt the accuracy of the information with which you were supplied; and now the impression is, that the speculators in grain, and those particularly who are large holders, and who are and must be deeply affected by falling prices, have been active in promoting the alarming accounts of the potato crop which have got into the papers.

I am very much inclined to coincide with this opinion. On this day we had a solemn dirge for the repose of the Liberator’s soul. I had an opportunity of speaking to several clergymen from the country, who attended on the melancholy occasion, and from them all I had assurances that the potato crop never looked more healthy and luxuriant than it does at present.

JOHN SHEEHAN, P.P.,
St. Patrick’s Waterford.

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