DESTITUTE EMIGRANTS.

The ship Medemseh, from Liverpool, and bound to New York, which lately put into this port for repairs, now lies at Cove, having on board a large number of emigrants chiefly of the lowest order, in the most destitute and debilitated condition. They are almost totally unprovided with clothing, without sufficient provisions, having consumed a great part of their scanty store while out, and scarcely with strength remaining to leave the hold. It reflects disgrace upon the regulations of the Government that creatures in this condition should be suffered to proceed to sea, with no other dependence against a long and enfeebling voyage than the kindness of persons whose treatment of their passengers, on an average, is hardly less brutal than that experienced from the masters of slave-ships.

No harm, in this instance, could arise from the Government giving relief, in a disaster, which to the poor emigrants, was entirely unforeseen; and they have an agent in the port, charged with the special duty of protecting the interests of this deserving, but much abused, and unfriended class. And yet, some time ago, when the sympathy of that officer was excited for a case of similar distress, he was left to beg a subscription of the inhabitants of this city, to help a number of disabled emigrants to their destination.

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