POTATO ROT.


LIBERAL AND JUST CONDUCT IN THIS AWFUL VISITATION OF A NEIGHBOURING FARMER.


TO THE EDITOR OF THE CORK EXAMINER.SIR,– Whilst the excellent sentiments contained in the letters of the 15th and 25th ult., addressed to the Premier, the Right Hon. Lord John Russell, on the appalling Potato Rot, by Joseph Lambert, Esq., of Brookhill, Claremorris, are warmly eulogised by the Dublin Freeman in leading articles of its numbers of the 20th and 29th ult.; and whilst eulogistic terms are put forth deservedly, and justly, in your columns and your contemporaries of the mnost benevolent and most christian conduct of Mr. James Welply of Macroom, for his very considerate and humane treatment of his conacre and other tenants, forgiving the former their rent and cost of manure, and desiring the latter to keep their corn for the ensuing season’s food for their families, there is, thank God, just praise and commendation in these times of extreme destitution and distress, in the kind, considerate and generous conduct evinced by a neighbouring farmer towards his labourers and con-acre tenants. Mr. Simon Brien, of Ballyntaylor, a townland situate three-and-a-half miles west from Dungarvan– Mr. Brien pays his labourers their wages, at the rate of ten pence per diem, and diet, since the commencement of the Potato blight– no deduction whatever is made from them for the rent of their houses, nor for their con-acre gardens, and he intends so to act until it pleases the All-wise Providence to relieve and remove this dearth and severe visitation from off the people of this afflicted and sore smitten land.

He, without hindrance or chance of any kind, freely allows each of his labourers and con-acre tenants to dig out and remove their potatoes– such as they are, off the land.

Let us hope that others, encouraged and stimulated by such laudable and benevolent example will come forth and “do likewise.”

Your giving the above sketch a place in your valuable and patriotic columns will, ’tis hoped, propel the growing spirit of benevolence and just feeling for our distressed fellow-men, and at the same time much oblige a well wisher to the cause of

HUMANITY.
Dungarvan, September 1st, 1846.


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